upage_uniandes

Universidad de los Andes
Bogotá, Colombia

Universidad de los Andes is an autonomous, independent and innovative institution that fosters pluralism, tolerance and respect for ideas; seeks academic excellence and imparts to its students a critical and ethical training to strengthen their awareness of their social and civic responsibilities, as well as their commitment to the environment.

Los Andes is a leading University and a benchmark in higher education in Latin America, guided by the principle of excellence, it is also inclusive, diverse, supportive, innovative and international, which contributes to society through quality and relevance of its teaching and research / creation, and for the professional quality, leadership capacity and ethics of its graduates.

The World University Ranking QS has placed Los Andes among the best 227 universities in the world, the top 5 in Latin America and the best in Colombia. It is currently the only Colombian private University with the national accreditation for 10 years from 2015-2025.

Website: https://uniandes.edu.co/en

VSE Season 1, 2021-22: Courses offered by Universidad de los Andes


Application Deadline

APPLICATION CLOSED
Students must submit an application to the VSE Central Office before:
Jul 15 2021, 12:00 noon Hong Kong Time (UTC+8)




English Language Proficiency Requirements

Before applying, please make sure you have fulfilled the course offering university's English language proficiency requirements listed below:

For courses taught in English: CEFR English B1-B2
For courses taught in Spanish: CEFR Spanish B1-B2

For more details, please contact the VSE coordinator at UniAndes.



Course Information

Click on the course titles to reveal full course details:

Number of Credits 2
Offering Department Department of Anthropology
Course Teacher Friederike Fleischer
Language of Instruction English
First Day of Class Aug 9, 2021
Last Day of Class Oct 2, 2021
Course Component Lecture
Mode of Teaching Synchronous
Meeting Time Mon, Wed 1400-1545
Time Zone UTC-5
Course Description For the first time in history, today more people live in urban areas than in the countryside. According to ourworldindata.org (https://ourworldindata.org/urbanization#number-of-people-living-in-urban-areas), in 2017 over half of the world’s roughly seven billion inhabitants resided in cities and this proportion is predicted to increase to over 70% by 2050. The majority of the fastest growing cities in the world are in developing countries. The study of this phenomenon, and the urban form of life, is therefore more important than ever. This course approaches the city from different angles: history, economy, politics, society, and culture. Within these different fields we will examine the interrelation between the city and human development; between the city, the economy and globalization; between the city and forms and practices of everyday life; between the city, art and popular culture; and between technology and the future of the city. More specifically we will explore questions relating to the emergence of cities; factors that contribute to the continuing urbanization of the world; cities’ structures and shapes; urban politics and the challenges of urban planning; forms and problems of urban life and culture; imaginations and representation of cities across time; and how the city of the future can be imagined and planned.
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Number of Credits 2
Offering Department Faculty of Arts
Course Teacher Verónica Uribe
Language of Instruction English
First Day of Class Aug 9, 2021
Last Day of Class Oct 2, 2021
Course Component Lecture
Mode of Teaching Synchronous/Asynchronous
Meeting Time Wed, Fri 0900–1045
Time Zone UTC-5
Points to Note for Students This is a blended course. Face-to-face sessions will be recorded for those who cannot attend in person.
Course Description This course proposes a visual and conceptual tour to understand the cultural relevance that travelling has had both in European and American art history and the way that voyages have been traditionally represented in Western culture. The course is divided into four parts with different case studies that deal with the relationship between art and travel:

Module 1: Works of art that travel.
Module 2: Materials and techniques that travel.
Module 3: Ideas, images and concepts that travel.
Module 4: Traveling artists

Examples of the subjects proposed for each two-week module are: art related to the pilgrimage in the Middle Ages; printmaking and its relationship to travel during the Renaissance; the importance of the artist’s skethbook in travelling; the Quimbaya Treasure as an official gift that travelled from Colombia to Spain; Paul Gauguin and Tahiti and the artistic contents of the Westmoreland ship. The course focuses on examples of historical and cultural events that created a modern notion of travelling by showing that the relationship between art and travel is dynamic and in constant change.

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Number of Credits 2
Offering Department Department of Music
Course Teacher Ian Middleton
Language of Instruction Spanish
First Day of Class Oct 11, 2021
Last Day of Class Dec 4, 2021
Course Component Lecture
Mode of Teaching Synchronous
Meeting Time Tue, Thu 0930–1045
Time Zone UTC-5
Course Description Music is a set of sound and choreographic activities that not only reflect but also help to build societies. Understanding the music of a place is a way of getting closer to its multiple cultural, social and historical dynamics. This course is an introduction to the north and west of Colombia through the lens of its musical practices.

It will consider how music is related to religious ceremonies, secular festivals, commercial presentations and recordings, violence and projects for peace, migrations and the new cultural practices that they generate. It will also be seen how the music of the coasts is related to the ideas of region, nation and transnational constructions such as Latin America and the African diaspora, as well as issues such as class, racialization, ethnicity, gender and sexuality.

Taking demonstrations, recordings, teacher research, and ethnographies as primary sources, listening and seeing skills are developed and applied to critically understand Colombia from its margins, thus increasing our empathy with the multiple cultural groups that inhabit them and their changing relationships with various “imagined communities”, within and beyond borders.

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Number of Credits 2
Offering Department Department of Literature
Course Teacher Hugo Hernán Ramírez
Language of Instruction Spanish
First Day of Class Aug 9, 2021
Last Day of Class TBD
Course Component Lecture
Mode of Teaching Synchronous/Asynchronous
Meeting Time Wednesdays 9:00 – 10:45 am
Time Zone UTC-5
Points to Note for Students This is a blended course. Face-to-face sessions will be recorded for those who cannot attend in person.
Course Description Macondo is the fictional setting for several narrative works by Gabriel García Márquez. This imaginary village has been associated with a specific town (Aracataca), with a symbol of the carnival and festivity of the Caribbean, or with a universe that encapsulates historical processes and social phenomena that mark the history of Colombia in the 19th and 20th centuries. Using the reading of three novels: The leaf litter (1955), The Colonel has no one who writes him (1961) and One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967), as well as some stories and press releases written between 1948 and 1972, students will recognize the way in which we can read there what García Márquez himself called “the Macondo cycle” (Luis Harss, Los Nuestro, 418). Tracing the formation of the Macondo cycle will allow us to know the Colombian, the Caribbean, the Latin American that is expressed in the dialogues of the characters, in the way of thinking and acting of the protagonists, in the stories associated with an imaginary people, a family , to an environment. The direct and individual reading of texts, the use of online resources, the master class, the discussion and group reflection will lead students to recognize and understand, for example, the origin, progress and slow degradation of Macondo, but also the construction of an aesthetic and the search for ethical values.
Course Outline TBA

Number of Credits 3
Offering Department Industrial Design
Course Teacher Carolina Obregón Tarazona
Language of Instruction English
First Day of Class Aug 9, 2021
Last Day of Class Dec 4, 2021
Course Component Lecture
Mode of Teaching Synchronous
Meeting Time Wed, Fri 0930-1045
Time Zone UTC-5
Course Description In the course sustainability is addressed in the real world, challenging to improve and/or build a sustainable system. Through a disruptive system thinking and design methodology, Disrupters explore, discover, interpret, limit and propose strategic interventions for wicked problems. The proposed methodology looks to intervene with disruptive solutions to tackle the triple bottom line: people, planet and profit.

The course is structured in two parts, starting with an introduction to sustainability theory with emphasis on videos, readings and virtual classroom discussions. Through systems, regenerative cultures and disruptive thinking sustainability is visualized through a macro lens, in order to identify problem’s specificities. This is done to steer off a linear thinking approach.

The second part will continue with the topics studied on the first part, and then applied as proof of concept. The project will apply systemic and holistic tools that reflect ethical values of a contemporary sustainable designer. The project seeks to foster disruptive and speculative solutions for complex, ambiguous and wicked problems brought on by a diversity of industries.

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Number of Credits 2
Offering Department Chemical and Food Engineering
Course Teacher Nicolas Rios Ratkovich
Language of Instruction Spanish
First Day of Class Aug 9, 2021
Last Day of Class Oct 2, 2021
Course Component Lecture
Mode of Teaching Synchronous
Meeting Time Fri 1400–1745
Time Zone UTC-5
Course-specific Restrictions For students over 18 years old.
Course Description The course will show the history of cocktails, covering classic cocktails, which are the basis for what is known as mixology. The definition of mixology is the art and skill of preparing mixed drinks to create cocktails. The mixologist seeks to reinterpret classic drinks and create new ones. Mixology is generally accepted as a more refined term and a more in-depth study of the art of mixing drinks. At the end of the course, the student will be able to master the basic techniques for making cocktails. The course will provide an overview of mixology, thereby developing a solid understanding of how to balance a cocktail between the spirit drink, the sweetness and the sour / sour component of cocktails. In addition, this course is based on project-based learning (PBL – Problem-Based Learning) where students will have first-hand the opportunity to make their signature cocktails and develop a cocktail menu.
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Number of Credits 3
Offering Department Industrial Engineering
Course Teacher Gonzalo Torres Cadena
Language of Instruction Spanish
First Day of Class Aug 9, 2021
Last Day of Class Dec 4, 2021
Course Component Lecture
Mode of Teaching Synchronous
Meeting Time Tue, Thu 0930–1045
Time Zone UTC-5
Course-specific Restrictions Basic knowledge in Probability, Statistics and Optimization Models
Course Description Unlike traditional marketing courses, which generally adopt a conceptual, empirical, and qualitative perspective, this course is designed to provide the participant with the instruction required to perform adequately in information technology-intensive environments. The course provides the basic training that allows transferring concepts into effective marketing decisions and actions, through quantitative techniques and computational models. It is not intended in this course to make the student an expert analyst or modeler. More is intended to make you an intelligent consumer of the results generated by third parties.
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Number of Credits 2
Offering Department Mechanical Engineering
Course Teacher Giacomo Barbieri
Language of Instruction English
First Day of Class Aug 9, 2021
Last Day of Class Dec 4, 2021
Course Component Lecture
Mode of Teaching Synchronous
Meeting Time Mon, Wed 1100-1215
Time Zone UTC-5
Course Description A maintenance engineer is an engineer with a multidisciplinary background involving science, engineering, and technology, who is responsible to optimize the operation of the physical assets of an enterprise. This professional focuses on the analysis of equipment, procedures, and resources to increase the operational reliability of physical assets while reducing maintenance costs. This course is primarily aimed at engineering students who want to acquire the basic knowledge to start a career as maintenance engineer.

In this course, the principles of maintenance engineering are first introduced to enable: (i) the assessment of maintenance processes through key performance indicators (KPIs); (ii) the prioritization of maintenance analyses based on risk criteria. Then, maintenance management concepts are illustrated for the planning and execution of the different maintenance tasks. Finally, Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) and Reliability Availability and Maintainability (RAM) simulation are shown to enable the assessment of the operational reliability of physical assets and to support decision-making in corrective and preventive maintenance actions.

Course Outline Download



The number of credits is shown as provided by the course offering university. The credit structure at the course offering university may be different from the one at your home university. Please contact the VSE Coordinator of your home university for credit transfer information.

Course enrollment is subject to final approval from your home university and the course offering university.