Shanghai-Jiao-Tong

Shanghai Jiao Tong University
Shanghai, China

Shanghai Jiao Tong University is one of the oldest and most prestigious universities in China. Since its establishment in 1896, the fundamental mission of the university has been to nurture first-class talent, accomplish top scholarship and drive the nation’s development.

SJTU has 31 schools/departments, 47 research platforms, and 13 hospitals affiliated to its medical school. The University offers 67 undergraduate programs covering disciplines of economics, law, literature, science, engineering, agriculture, medicine, management and arts, 42 first-level disciplines authorized to confer doctorate degrees and 57 first-level disciplines authorized to confer master degrees. By December 2018, there are 16,129 undergraduates and 30,217 postgraduates, more than 7000 international students on campus including 2,982 in degree programs. There are over 3,100 full-time faculty members, including 44 academicians of two academies (the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Chinese Academy of Engineering).

Internationalization has always played an important role in the development of SJTU. Currently SJTU has more than 150 institutional cooperation agreements with well-known universities around the world and has 60 double-degree programs in place. More than 45% of its undergraduate students have a study-abroad experience over the four years of studies at SJTU. SJTU aspires to build a world-class university with featured attributes of being “comprehensive, research-intensive and international”, to fulfill its core mission of serving the societal development and mankind through knowledge advancement, educating future generations of leaders and providing driving forces of innovation for economic growth and public good.

Website: en.sjtu.edu.cn
Facebook: facebook.com/sjtu1896/
Twitter: twitter.com/sjtu1896
Instagram: instagram.com/shanghai_jiao_tong_uni/

VSE Season 3, 2021-22: Courses offered by Shanghai Jiao Tong University


Application Deadline

Students must submit an application to the VSE Central Office before:
May 15, 2022 12:00 noon Hong Kong Time (UTC+8)




Academic Requirements

Before applying, please make sure you have fulfilled the course offering university's academic requirements listed below:

GPA of 3.0 or above

For more details, please contact the VSE coordinator at SJTU.




English Language Proficiency Requirements

Before applying, please make sure you have fulfilled the course offering university's English language proficiency requirements listed below:

80 or above in TOEFL/
6.0 or above in IELTS/
other equivalent language proof may be acceptable.

For more details, please contact the VSE coordinator at SJTU.




Additional Application Requirements

After submitting an application to an academic course offered by SJTU on the VSE application system, applicants must also complete an additional application form from SJTU.

For more details, please contact the VSE coordinator at SJTU.



Course Information

Course information posted on this page are provided by the course offering university and may be changed or updated anytime without prior notice.

Click on the course titles to reveal full course details:

Number of Credits2
Offering DepartmentSchool of Naval Architecture, Ocean & Civil Engineering
Course TeacherProf. Jian Yang
Language of InstructionEnglish
First Day of ClassJul 4, 2022
Last Day of ClassJul 24, 2022
Course ComponentSeminarWorkshopProject
Mode of TeachingSynchronousSynchronousSynchronous
Meeting TimeTBATBATBA
Time ZoneUTC+8
Course DescriptionBuildings and infrastructures cost more than 50% non-recycled resources and energy in the lifecycle, having non-recoverable impacts on the Earth. It is of necessity to understand and implement the concept of sustainability. Meanwhile, urban cities are facing the unprecedented challenges posed by climate change effects, e.g., frequent occurrence of extreme weather and disaster. City resilience has become never more urgent nowadays. This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the environmental and resource implications of construction activity within the context of sustainable development and city resilience. It considers the theoretical and methodological basis of approaches designed to quantify the impacts associated with choices made at different stages of the construction life cycle, as well as tools designed to evaluate sustainability and resilient performance. By completing a real-life project, students should demonstrate the ability to develop rational ideas and methodologies to fulfil the required performance in a holistic manner with justification.
Course OutlineTBA
Course Prerequisites/RestrictionsN/A
Points to Note for StudentsN/A
Number of Credits1
Offering DepartmentKoguan School of Law
Course TeacherProf. Dr. Matthias Vanhullebusch;
Joint Instructor: Prof. Dr. Wang Heng, University of New South Wales
Language of InstructionEnglish
First Day of ClassJul 1, 2022
Last Day of ClassJul 8, 2022
Course ComponentLectureDiscussion
Mode of TeachingSynchronousSynchronous
Meeting TimeJul 1: 1200-1400; Jul 4-5: 0800-1000, 1200-1400; Jul 6-8: 1200-1400Jul 1: 1200-1400; Jul 4-5: 0800-1000, 1200-1400; Jul 6-8: 1200-1400
Time ZoneUTC+8
Course DescriptionThis course introduces students to the UN Sustainable Development Goal (UNSDG) 16 (Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions) within the context of ongoing rule of law efforts amongst participating nations in the Belt and Road Initiative. It covers various governance strategies to promote those reforms in the realm of economic relations, development finance and security management. It offers a fresh insight into how relational governance continues to play an important role towards rule-based governance strategies. In addition, it pays particular attention to the underlying factors and relationships that determine whether or not international norms dealing with economic, development and security relationships can gain root, and thus, the likelihood that those norms will govern their relationships in the long-term.
Course OutlineTBA
Course Prerequisites/RestrictionsGood English proficiency (oral and written)
Points to Note for StudentsN/A
Number of Credits2
Offering DepartmentKoguan School of Law
Course TeacherDr. Jur. Chenguo Zhang;
Joint Instructor: Prof. Jyh-An Lee, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Language of InstructionEnglish
First Day of ClassJun 21, 2022
Last Day of ClassJul 5, 2022
Course ComponentLectureDiscussion
Mode of TeachingSynchronousSynchronous
Meeting TimeTBA (Afternoon of 21, 23, 28, 30 Jun, 4 and 5 Jul)TBA (Afternoon of 21, 23, 28, 30 Jun, 4 and 5 Jul)
Time ZoneUTC+8
Course DescriptionThe development of the Internet and, more recently, Internet-based applications such as Facebook, Kaixin Wang, Weibo, Twitter, Whatsapp, Wechat, Spotify, Uber, Didi Taxi, Airbnb have generated new types of communications between individuals across the globe. The rise of the internet has disrupted many aspects of our society, including law. Courts, policymakers, and law enforcement officials around the globe are struggling to resolve the clashes, both by adapting existing legal remedies and by developing new ones.

This course will examine the effect of the internet on varied areas of legal doctrine, including intellectual property, technology related ethics, privacy, jurisdiction, contract, collective enforcement of consumer protection in the context of digital economy, Internet and manipulation of public opinion, information cocoon and national education. It also considers specialized internet regulation such as intermediary liability regimes, platform regulation, new challenges for the policymaking regarding the sharing economy. This course will explore how China (and for a comparative law analysis also the United States, European Union, and other countries) are currently responding to the new challenges and are likely to respond in the coming years.
Course OutlineTBA
Course Prerequisites/RestrictionsHave at least basic knowledge in law.
Points to Note for StudentsN/A
Number of Credits2
Offering DepartmentSchool of International and Public Affairs
Course TeacherDr. Ruolin Su
Language of InstructionEnglish
First Day of ClassJun 20, 2022
Last Day of ClassJul 6, 2022
Course ComponentLectureDiscussion
Mode of TeachingSynchronousSynchronous
Meeting TimeMon, Wed, Fri 0900-1200Mon, Wed, Fri 0900-1200
Time ZoneUTC+8
Course DescriptionWhy do countries fight? When do wars terminate? How do states avoid military conflict? All of these questions call for well-thought-out answers as the world is still far from being peaceful, just and inclusive. For too many people living in fragile and conflict-affected countries, safety and security, equality and opportunity, and just and lasting peace remain as elusive as ever. The course, echoing the call of SDG NO.16 (i.e., Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions), aims to first inspire students to analyze causes of conflict, and second innovate them to investigate solutions of conflict resolution and peace maintenance. Specifically, students will examine deep roots of violence around the world or in a specific region of interest, reflect on the consequences of armed conflicts, and seek superior institutional arrangement to promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development. This course, by surveying the scholarly literature on war and peace at an introductory level, will give students a critical understanding of the most important features and dynamics in world politics, and the central problems of war and peace. The course will provide students with an opportunity to assess the state of knowledge in the field, identify new questions and approaches, and formulate knowledge-based policies and strategies.
Course OutlineTBA
Course Prerequisites/RestrictionsN/A
Points to Note for StudentsN/A
Number of Credits2
Offering DepartmentSchool of International and Public Affairs
Course TeacherDr. Fan Yang
Language of InstructionEnglish
First Day of ClassJun 20, 2022
Last Day of ClassJul 15, 2022
Course ComponentLectureTutorialSeminar
Mode of TeachingSynchronousSynchronousSynchronous
Meeting TimeMon, Wed; Time TBAMon, Wed; Time TBAMon, Wed; Time TBA
Time ZoneUTC+8
Course DescriptionDoes poverty only mean a shortage of food and material possessions? How does it associate with the mental health of different populations, such as females, working class, and sexual minority? Is the widespread gig economy, labelled with freedom, autonomy, and self-determination, a cure or a toxicant for poverty? And, what can technologies do to combat poverty and protect the mental health of the population living in poverty?

Drawing on cases in different countries, this course will lead students to explore the answers to these interesting and significant questions. Instructors will introduce some baseline frameworks, utilizing insights from psychology, sociology, and social policy. Based on these frameworks, students with different academic backgrounds are supposed to form several seminar topics that relate with Sustainable Development Goals (i.e., No.1, No.2, No.3, and No.10) set by the United Nations. After taking the course, students are expected to get a fuller picture of poverty problems in the world as well as how they are dealt with by governments.

This course encourages meaningful intra- and inter-group interactions. Students of different academic perspectives form study groups, and each study group will explore solutions to one specific poverty problem.
Course OutlineTBA
Course Prerequisites/RestrictionsN/A
Points to Note for StudentsN/A
Number of Credits2
Offering DepartmentSchool of International and Public Affairs
Course TeacherDr. Yuan Tian
Language of InstructionEnglish
First Day of ClassJun 20, 2022
Last Day of ClassJul 15, 2022
Course ComponentLectureDiscussion
Mode of TeachingSynchronous/ AsynchronousSynchronous/ Asynchronous
Meeting TimeTue, Fri 0900-1130Tue, Fri 0900-1130
Time ZoneUTC+8
Course DescriptionWhy do people give and help others? Are there some people who are more caring versus more selfish? If so, are they born that way or are these qualities teachable? How do prosocial traits and behaviors change across the lifespan? What happens to the brain and body when people give and help? Which situations increase or inhibit helping behaviors? This course will cover the broad landscape of the different philanthropy literature on giving-related traits, motives, and behaviors. It will include readings from developmental, biological / neuro, personality, social, cross-cultural, and health philanthropy. Students will leave with a comprehensive understanding of the philanthropy of giving time, money, and care to others.
Because of the applied nature of much of the research discussed in the class, students will develop an understanding of empirical research methods and different interpretations of various methods (e.g. correlational versus longitudinal versus experimental). This course will also help them to be comfortable in designing empirical research towards philanthropy development. The course will facilitate student groups to develop empirical research projects towards philanthropy development.
Course OutlineTBA
Course Prerequisites/RestrictionsN/A
Points to Note for StudentsN/A
Number of Credits1
Offering DepartmentSchool of Agriculture and Biology
Course TeacherProfessor Kexuan Tang; Associate Professor Qifang Pan; Associate Professor Yuliang Wang
Language of InstructionEnglish
First Day of ClassJul 4, 2022
Last Day of ClassJul 15, 2022
Course ComponentDiscussion
Mode of TeachingSynchronous
Meeting TimeMon, Tue, Wed, Fri 0900-1040
Time ZoneUTC+8
Course DescriptionMalaria is an infectious disease with the highest mortality rate in the world. Mankind has been struggling with it since ancient times. However, WHO’s goal of clearing it has not yet been reached, and there is a rebound trend in the past two years. This course covers the discovery and development history of malaria, the prevention and control of vector mosquitoes, as well as the main drugs research and development, and their clinical application on malaria. Artemisinin is the best drug for the treatment of malaria resistance. The combination therapy based on artemisinin drugs is also the most effective and important means for the treatment of malaria. In recent years, with the deepening of research, more and more other functions of artemisinin have been found and applied. However, the supply of artemisinin is unstable and the price fluctuates.

This course introduces the history of malaria transmission, vector mosquito prevention and control and the research and development of malaria drugs, such as the biosynthetic regulation and production of artemisinin, so that students can understand the harm of malaria and the urgency of malaria control, explore the methods to ensure the continuous, stable and low-cost supply of the anti-malaria drug artemisinin, and stimulate students to think about the strategy of eradicating malaria. Through the study and discussion of this course, students will have a new understanding of malaria and the current situation of malaria control, fully understand China's efforts and contributions to the global anti malaria cause, and deeply think about the best strategy of global malaria control for the benefit of all mankind.
Course OutlineTBA
Course Prerequisites/RestrictionsN/A
Points to Note for StudentsN/A
Number of Credits2
Offering DepartmentDepartment of History & School of Design
Course TeacherJoint Instructors: Chihyun Chang; Dr. Qian Du; Tim Lockley, Warwick University; Dr. Pierre Purseigle, Warwick University.
Language of InstructionEnglish
First Day of ClassJun 20, 2022
Last Day of ClassJul 7, 2022
Course ComponentLectureGroup DiscussionGroup Project
Mode of TeachingSynchronousSynchronousSynchronous
Meeting TimeMon, Wed, Fri 1700-1945Mon, Wed, Fri 1700-1945Mon, Wed, Fri 1700-1945
Time ZoneUTC+8
Course DescriptionThis course aims to answer the question of how modern port cities managed themselves in the 19th and 20th centuries and created an intercultural sphere for global inhabitants. The core of this course focuses on East Asian port cities which were opened by the “unequal treaties” with the foreign powers in the mid-19th century. The opening of the port cities in East Asia also provided the world with an access to settle down in these treaty ports and provided China, Japan and Korea with an opportunity to observe and learn from the West. Because of the cultural gap between the East and the West, the port cities naturally built up settlements and concessions for dividing various communities. The design of which could decrease the potential tensions between ethnicities or nationalities but it could not stop the following issues of globalisation, such as the spreading of diseases, crimes, pollution, etc. Thus, these port cites then had to work out solutions for communicating different concessions and settlements.

The other focus of this course is to bring in specialists who study other continents’ port cities, such as in North America and Continental Europe, and to provide students with a comparative perspective for advanced knowledge of the urban issues shared by all port cities. This course then focuses on the shared issues, such as cultural preservation, migration, crimes, diseases, pollution, inflation, etc., in American and European port cities. Thus, Professor Lockley and Professor Purseigle are invited to demonstrate their knowledge about port cities in North America and Europe. Students can then understand how the shared challenges affected global port cities in the 19th and 20th centuries.
Course OutlineTBA
Course Prerequisites/RestrictionsN/A
Points to Note for StudentsFull-time undergraduate students of all disciplines from universities around the world are welcome.
Number of Credits1
Offering DepartmentSchool of Pharmacy
Course TeacherProf. Chongsheng Peng
Language of InstructionEnglish
First Day of ClassJun 22, 2022
Last Day of ClassJul 6, 2022
Course ComponentLectureDiscussion
Mode of TeachingSynchronousSynchronous
Meeting Time22, 29 Jun & 2, 6 Jul; 1400-174022, 29 Jun & 2, 6 Jul; 1400-1740
Time ZoneUTC+8
Course DescriptionThe course, “Traditional Medicine and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals”, will enable participants to collaborate online. Chinese and international students attending the course will create a group e-poster on a selected medicinal plant. Students will attend online lectures that cover UN SDGs by the instructor and be divided into groups. Each group will choose a medicinal plant from a given list and discuss the connection of this medicinal plant to the principals of SDG of the project: SDG3-Good Health and Well-being with the guidance by teachers, and how this medicinal plant may address additional SDGs (global issues). Some examples of additional SDGs would be, but not limited to, SDG1, SDG8, SDG10, and SDG15. Explain why and how the additional SDG(s) can be addressed.
Course OutlineTBA
Course Prerequisites/RestrictionsN/A
Points to Note for StudentsNo specific restrictions. However, students majoring in medicine, pharmacy, biology, chemistry, and agriculture may feel more familiar with the course contents, although this is not definite.
Number of Credits2
Offering DepartmentLow Carbon College
Course TeacherDr. Chong Cheng Tung;
Joint Instructors: Prof. Agustin Valera-Medina, Cardiff University; Dr. Jo-Han Ng, University of Southampton Malaysia
Language of InstructionEnglish
First Day of ClassJun 20, 2022
Last Day of ClassJul 7, 2022
Course ComponentLectureGroup DiscussionGroup Project
Mode of TeachingSynchronousSynchronousSynchronous
Meeting TimeMon - Thu 1600-1900Mon - Thu 1600-1900Mon - Thu 1600-1900
Time ZoneUTC+8
Course DescriptionAs nations bind together to tackle global climate change, one of the urgent needs is the energy sector’s transition from being fossil-fuel reliant to embracing sustainable carbon-free solutions. Through a multi-national collaboration, this course aims to introduce a redefined perspective of fuel utilisation for the power and transportation sectors, placing emphasis on alternative fuels derived from renewable resources that are essential contributors to the goals of carbon neutrality. Some of the low or zero-carbon fuels such as hydrogen, ammonia, biofuels and emerging low carbon fuels adaptable to current or new energy systems will be explored in the context of production, utilisation, economics and sustainability. The impacts of future fuels on the environment, resource availability and social well-being need to be holistically considered and supported by diverse solutions, in alignment with the Sustainable Development Goals of Affordable and Clean Energy (SDG 7) and other related SDGs as put forth by the United Nations. From this course, the students will grasp the broad concept of alternative fuel production, application and challenges faced in moving towards a net zero-carbon society.
Course OutlineTBA
Course Prerequisites/RestrictionsN/A
Points to Note for Students1. Full-time undergraduate students of all disciplines from universities around the world are welcome.
2. Participants are required to attain a passing mark of ≥60, attend 70% of the course live online (including the final day presentation) to be eligible for the graduating E-certificate.
3. Ensure your availability for the course before registering.


Before Making an Application

Make sure you have thoroughly read the information on this page and the Academics page before making an application. If you have a question, email us at apru.vse@cuhk.edu.hk or contact the VSE Coordinators at your home university or course offering university,