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Korea University
Seoul, South Korea

Founded in 1905, the Korea University (KU) campus covers over 182 acres and is home to more than 35,000 students from all over the nation and the world.

The university’s academic breadth is extensive with its 81 departments in 19 colleges and divisions, and 18 graduate schools and it has over 1,400 full-time faculty members with over 95% of them holding a Ph.D. or equivalent qualification in their field. KU has particularly strong Humanities and Asian Studies Departments along with the recently established Graduate School of International Studies (GSIS). KU is also renowned for its professional schools of Law, Medicine and Business Administration. In research, KU is an internationally recognized leader with over 100 research centers, including the East Asiatic Research Centre and the Korean Cultural Research Centre. Furthermore, Korea University Business School (KUBS) is the only and the first business school in the country to have acquired both European Quality Improvement System (EQUIS) accreditation, in combination with the accreditation granted by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB).

Website: www.korea.edu

VSE Summer Semester 2021: Korea University (International Summer Campus)


Application Deadline

APPLICATION CLOSED
Students must submit an application to the VSE Central Office before:
May 14 2021, 12:00 noon Hong Kong Time (UTC+8)



Course Information

Click on the course titles to reveal full course details:
Number of Credits3
Offering DepartmentOffice of International Affairs
Course TeacherHaerin SHIN (Korea University)
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassJune 29, 2021
Last Day of ClassAugust 5, 2021
Course ComponentLecture
Mode of TeachingSynchronous / Asynchronous
Meeting TimeMon-Thu 1300-1440
Time ZoneUTC+9
Course Description Cultures and societies stand at the intersection of diverse traditions, ethnicities, race, value systems and other categories of identification. Among the many nodes that constellate this colorful landscape, members of certain communities who bear social markers that stand apart from the perceived mainstream or the upper strata of social hierarchy are labeled “minority,” and are often represented in ways that frame their presence as alien— strangers in their own home land. Whether it be outright discrimination, unsavory stereotypes, or their satiric appropriations that seemingly subvert but also insidiously reinforce deeply ingrained prejudices, mechanisms of alienation permeate our society on countless fronts. Situating the contemporary mediascape in this broader context of minority discourse, this class invites students to problematize accepted metrics of normalcy and investigate their modes of delivery across different mediums, asking questions such as the following: could the use of racial, ethnic, and cultural stereotypes be justified when framed as critical commentary? How are we to demarcate the thin line between appropriation and inordinate reproduction? What happens when “otherness” as concept becomes translated (in other words, technologized) across mediums such as from written text to visual media, and how may we understand the gaps and misalignments that constitute this process? How does technology, in communicating indexes of otherness or as a source of power in the age of global capital, serve as a double-edged sword in addressing the issues of alienation when specifically applied to the Asian context? The course will provide an introduction to theories and critical reflections that pertain to key concepts in postcolonial/decolonial discourse, including the ‘other,’ hybridity, identity, and ethnicity through works by scholars such as Homi K. Bhabha, Edward Said, Gayathri Spivak, and explore contemporary media productions that represent the multivalent facets of otherness across TV, film, written fiction, and more. Students will engage in group presentations, in-class writing, plenary/small group discussions, and media projects.
Course OutlineDownload
Number of Credits3
Offering DepartmentOffice of International Affairs
Course TeacherHaerin SHIN (Korea University)
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassJune 29, 2021
Last Day of ClassAugust 5, 2021
Course ComponentLecture
Mode of TeachingSynchronous / Asynchronous
Meeting TimeMon-Thu 1500-1640
Time ZoneUTC+9
Course Description As breakthroughs in medical and computer science continuously expand the scope of our bodily and mental presence, the question concerning technology – the role it plays in defining our being and reality, its functional mechanism, and the effects such new methods of mediation exert upon our perception and cognition – presses us with an ever-growing urgency. How do we define and know who we are, and how does one certify his or her own existence, in an age when mechanical augmentation, extension, or even replacement of the body is a realistic venture, and the properties of the human mind can be reproduced, preserved, and/or emulated in the form of digital code? If the human body and its operational constitution could be compatible with that of machines, and self-evolving machines could interact with or even replace humans in their intellectual capacity, what does being human and discerning the grounds of the reality we inhabit involve, and mean? Do new mediatory means reconfigure the way in which we perceive, comprehend, and in turn build the world we live in? This course explores how new media represent, reflect on, and inspire reality and being by focusing on the structure and workings of digital and other types of telepresence technology. Students will examine how presence and its representation have transitioned from analog to digital, and organic to mechanic channels of mediation and instantiation. Course materials and exercises will include primary materials ranging from short stories to film, animation, TV, games, virtual reality content, etc., and theoretical/critical works on various media/form. In addition to reading the assigned texts, students will be expected to engage in class discussions, collective in-class writings, short individual writings, and group/solo presentations.
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Number of Credits3
Offering DepartmentOffice of International Affairs
Course TeacherJen Youngstrom (The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassJune 29, 2021
Last Day of ClassAugust 5, 2021
Course ComponentLecture
Mode of TeachingSynchronous / Asynchronous
Meeting TimeMon-Thu 0840-1020
Time ZoneUTC+9
Course Description The overarching goals of this class are to introduce you to the outlines of psychology as a scientific discipline and foster critical thinking about the facts and theories. Psychology is a broad field, and psychological topics are studied from several different perspectives. We will touch on many of the major questions, theories, and research findings of psychology. Of course, since we have only 6 weeks to cover the entire field of psychology, our consideration of most topics must be rather selective and brief. However, after this course, you should be familiar with the basics and be prepared for further study in more advanced psychology courses. I also hope that this course will increase your curiosity and your interest in the field of psychology. In order to make this a stimulating course, you need to contribute your time, effort, attention, and your genuine curiosity. I want your active involvement.
Course OutlineDownload
Number of Credits3
Offering DepartmentOffice of International Affairs
Course TeacherDarcy Paquet (Busan Asian Film School), Jason Bechervaise (Movie Critic)
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassJune 29, 2021
Last Day of ClassAugust 5, 2021
Course ComponentLecture
Mode of TeachingSynchronous / Asynchronous
Meeting TimeMon-Thu 1500-1640
Time ZoneUTC+9
Course Description This course will provide a broad background to contemporary Korean cinema from a variety of perspectives: cultural, economic, political, historical, social.

Topics to be considered will include: how the major political and social changes that have taken place in Korea in recent decades have been reflected in local films; transformations in the structure of the Korean film industry over the past 15 years; the changing relationship between the local film industry and the Korean government; major internationally-renowned directors and their individual styles; and the development of certain genres within Korean cinema.

Each class will last approximately 100 minutes, and will include lectures, viewing of film clips and student discussion. All films will be screened with English subtitles.
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Number of Credits3
Offering DepartmentOffice of International Affairs
Course TeacherCarl Gunnlaugson (Laval University)
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassJune 29, 2021
Last Day of ClassAugust 5, 2021
Course ComponentLecture
Mode of TeachingSynchronous / Asynchronous
Meeting TimeMon-Thu 1030-1210
Time ZoneUTC+9
Course Description In today’s global organization, the effectiveness and overall success of today’s leader and manager to a great extent draws on their ability to communicate effectively. Business Communication is a theory-based, practice-driven course that introduces students to a wide cross section of ideas, practices and principles to improve their existing communication.

The online course as a whole is designed to enable students to develop skills in empowering their authentic presence to build communicative effectiveness and influence with communication situations in day to day organizational contexts. Through Zoom meetings, students will learn about and practice essential communicative skills through a range of exercises and assignments. Communication processes will focus more in depth with effective speaking and listening in conversation, non-verbal communication, conflict management, cross cultural and team communication, coaching, among other themes.

This entirely online course aims to introduce students to the skills to build effective, creative and meaningful communication in one on one, groups, teams and organizations. The course adopts innovative perspectives across different contexts of interpersonal and group communication. Different approaches to generative and creative methods of communication will be explored throughout the course. Business communication theory explored in the course will be immediately applicable to students and set the stage for ongoing communication mastery throughout their professional lives.
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Number of Credits3
Offering DepartmentOffice of International Affairs
Course TeacherShung Jae Shin (Portland State University)
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassJune 29, 2021
Last Day of ClassAugust 5, 2021
Course ComponentLecture
Mode of TeachingSynchronous / Asynchronous
Meeting TimeMon-Thu 1500-1640
Time ZoneUTC+9
Course Description This course focuses on issues that are relevant to the three levels of organizational behavior (i.e., individual, group, and organizational). Key topics include: the nature and dynamics of teams, personal values and employee job attitudes, interpersonal communication, conflict resolution, motivation, leadership, decision making, and organizational-level issues such as organizational politics, structure, design, and culture. Techniques used to facilitate learning consist of inquiry and discussion, role plays, case studies, YouTube videos, teamwork, and a term project. This course is designed for a summer class.
Course OutlineDownload
Number of Credits3
Offering DepartmentOffice of International Affairs
Course TeacherCarl Gunnlaugson (Laval University)
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassJune 29, 2021
Last Day of ClassAugust 5, 2021
Course ComponentLecture
Mode of TeachingSynchronous / Asynchronous
Meeting TimeMon-Thu 0840-1020
Time ZoneUTC+9
Course Description Today’s global business context calls for up and coming managers and leaders to develop their professional skills by not only successfully managing their teams and organizations, but perhaps most importantly, how to effectively manage themselves. Global Leadership and Management is a theory-based, though highly practical online course that focuses on developing practical management and leadership skills individually, interpersonally and collectively within teams and the broader organizational culture as a whole. Informed by current social science and business research, this course is designed to enable students to learn to manage their own life and relationships with others, to develop themselves as future leaders and future managers and to discover first-hand their passion for personal and professional development.

Management and leadership development concepts used in the course will be immediately applicable for students, but also set the stage for life long professional development. This course will focus primarily on your personal quest to thrive, by examining your own leadership strengths (and limitations), and professional experiences that enhance your capacity to lead and manage authentically in a new global business environment. Research has shown that certain essential skills are associated with managerial effectiveness. This course aims to help students understand what those skills are and how they can effectively develop them in their lives and at work.
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Number of Credits3
Offering DepartmentOffice of International Affairs
Course TeacherLin Cui (Australian National University)
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassJuly 12, 2021
Last Day of ClassAugust 5, 2021
Course ComponentLecture
Mode of TeachingSynchronous / Asynchronous
Meeting TimeMon-Thu 0900-1130
Time ZoneUTC+9
Course Description This course is a broad survey of the field of international business and provides the foundations for further specialisation in this field. It will begin with a brief overview of international business, focused on the concept of ‘globalisation’. The course will then examine the environment for international firms, particularly the political, social and economic configurations that support cross-border commerce. Amongst others, we will look at the role of national policies and cultures, the evolution of international markets in goods, services and finance, and the supernational mechanisms and infrastructures for trade, investment and finance. The course will then probe international firms: their strategies and organisational design, their entry modes into international enterprise, and their behavioural and control systems. Many parts of the course involve current events, including issues related to international trade, foreign investment and international political conflict.
Course OutlineDownload
Number of Credits3
Offering DepartmentOffice of International Affairs
Course TeacherMark Joseph Davison (Brunel University London)
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassJune 29, 2021
Last Day of ClassAugust 5, 2021
Course ComponentLecture
Mode of TeachingSynchronous / Asynchronous
Meeting TimeMon-Thu 1300-1440
Time ZoneUTC+9
Course Description This course gives you a broad introduction to the fascinating and ever-changing world of sustainability. We will explore how investors, companies, cities and countries are developing their own strategies to respond to one of today’s most important global challenges, that of encouraging sustainable development - development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.

Using a blend of contemporary movies and other media sources, lectures and case-based studies of well-known companies and cities, you will develop valuable tools and insights into examining how the strategies of companies and cities are impacting on sustainability and how they seek to future-proof themselves and the world in which they operate. You will collaborate extensively with your international peers to prepare a comprehensive analysis and presentation of the sustainability strategy of a company, a city, or a country of your group’s choice. Such interaction will take place during and outside of class and may take place in a physical classroom or online. Your instructor will regularly promote and support such collaborative activities, helping you develop your research, analytical, presentation and communication competencies in an international and intercultural environment.
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Number of Credits3
Offering DepartmentOffice of International Affairs
Course TeacherJudith Cherry (University of Sheffield)
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassJune 29, 2021
Last Day of ClassAugust 5, 2021
Course ComponentLecture
Mode of TeachingSynchronous / Asynchronous
Meeting TimeMon-Thu 1500-1640/td>
Time ZoneUTC+9
Course Description The overarching theme of this course is the transformation of South Korea from a povertystricken, war-ravaged country in the 1950s into a major global economic player in the early years of the 21st century. A secondary theme is South Korea’s trading, investment and business relations with the global economic community. The objective of this course is to give you an understanding of the driving forces and key players behind this extraordinary transformation, and an appreciation of the challenges that South Korea has faced during economic development, and continues to face today. You will be encouraged to reflect on a wide range of issues relating to economic development, international trade, business and investment, and to compare events, actors, systems and developments in your own country with those in South Korea. The international nature of the Summer Campus also provides an excellent opportunity for you to compare South Korea and its experiences with other countries in the global community, through discussions with your classmates.
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*The number of credits is shown as provided by the course offering university, and may not be equivalent to the credits at your home university. Please contact the APRU VSE Coordinator of your home university for credit transfer information.

Course enrollment is subject to final approval from your home university and the course offering university.