CUHK

The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Hong Kong SAR, China

The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) is a comprehensive research university with a global vision. As the second oldest university in the territory, CUHK distinguishes itself from other local universities with its firmly rooted Chinese culture, bilingualism and multiculturalism, and a unique college system that complements the formal learning experience through whole-person development and pastoral care.

CUHK has been at the forefront of research. It boasts a galaxy of distinguished scholars and researchers, including Nobel Laureates, a Fields medalist, a Turing Award winner, and members of the Royal Society. In its latest strategic plan, CUHK has identified four research priorities to build on its strengths and leading advantages in those areas to address some of the most pressing issues of the world today. These areas are China Studies, Translational Biomedicine, Information and Automation Technology and Environment and Sustainability. The prowess, variety and impact of research at CUHK can be further demonstrated from its establishment of five state key laboratories, past and ongoing Areas of Excellence research projects, and the many research institutes and collaborations with eminent overseas research institutions.

The University engages in academic and research partnerships with over 340 universities and institutions from around the world, internationalizing education and advancing the frontiers of knowledge and technology to address the many global challenges of today.

Website: https://cuhk.edu.hk/english/index.html

VSE Season 1, 2021-22: Courses offered by The Chinese University of Hong Kong


Application Deadline

APPLICATION CLOSED
Students must submit an application to the VSE Central Office before:
Aug 13 2021, 12:00 noon Hong Kong Time (UTC+8)



Course Information

Click on the course titles to reveal full course details:

Number of Credits3
Offering DepartmentDepartment of Anthropology
Course TeacherProfessor Gordon Clark MATHEWS
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassSep 9, 2021
Last Day of ClassDec 2, 2021
Course ComponentLectureTutorial
Mode of TeachingSynchronousSynchronous
Meeting TimeThu 1330-1515TBA
Time ZoneUTC+8
Course Description In societies across the world, people have different culturally-shaped senses of what their lives mean: people may live for money, love, honor, or fame; for family, company, country, or religion. This course examines the processes through which meanings of life are formulated and maintained in day-to-day life in societies past and present; it also explores life meaning as a way of comprehending the evolution of human societies. The course uses the concept of "meanings of life" as a window into the anthropological understanding of cultural difference and cultural evolution. Students will read intensively, and write an extensive paper exploring aspects of "meanings of life" as discussed by the course readings and by their own investigations.
Course OutlineDownload
Number of Credits3
Offering DepartmentDepartment of Anthropology
Course TeacherProfessor Andrew Byron KIPNIS
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassSep 8, 2021
Last Day of ClassDec 1, 2021
Course ComponentLectureTutorial
Mode of TeachingSynchronousSynchronous
Meeting TimeWed 1230-1415Wed 1430-1515
Time ZoneUTC+8
Course DescriptionThe remarkable economic emergence of China and Asia more broadly in recent decades has transformed many impoverished and largely agriculturally based societies into the most dynamic region of the contemporary world. China’s burgeoning aspirational middle classes, rapid urbanisation, time-space compression and the shift from command economies to de-regulated markets have had profound effects on people's everyday lives and the diverse cultural practices that have long shaped local livelihoods and community expectations. This course offers an introduction into anthropological approaches to the study of culture, modernity and globalisation in China and Asia more broadly. Relevant themes that have attracted anthropological interest include changing traditions and popular culture, adaptive custom and cosmopolitanism, migration and citizenship, identity politics and social movements as well as distinctive and emergent forms of governance in both collective and self-cultivating forms of expression. Drawing on a rich corpus of social theory and ethnographic research from anthropologists past and present, the course will provide students with conceptual and analytical tools to appreciate adaptive cultural practices in comparative terms, to review and appreciate the key anthropological debates and influential works in the study of modernity, and to introduce students to ethnographic approaches for researching and writing on modernity and contemporary ethnographies of global connection.
Course OutlineDownload
Number of Credits3
Offering DepartmentEntrepreneurship and Innovation Minor Programme
Course TeacherProfessor Dominic CHAN
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassSep 7, 2021
Last Day of ClassNov 30, 2021
Course ComponentLecture
Mode of TeachingSynchronous
Meeting TimeTue 1430-1715
Time ZoneUTC+8
Course-specific RestrictionsThis course is designed for students with substantive entrepreneurial experience or knowledge.
Course Description The EPIN minor is designed around three areas, namely mindset and values, skills and knowledge, and practice. It aims to educate students to develop an entrepreneurial mindset, which is to get one’s hands dirty to solve problems. This usually means starting something new. Many people interpret starting new as venturing into a startup, but it can also mean endeavouring a new project within established organizations.

This course is designed jointly by practitioners and the faculty member. As such, the classes will involve a number of practitioners with academic interest and background. It is an intermediate level course and assumes students to have basic knowledge on business and entrepreneurship, either from class learning or practice themselves. With its emphasis on skills, we will be doing some exercises, in-depth case discussion, or tutorial exercises in every class rather than running as lecture classes. Throughout the course, students shall work with a new venture, to practice their skills. Our aim is to combine good theory and meaningful knowledge with meaningful practices, so that students will learn theory and practices of being an entrepreneur, an innovative manager, or a creative practitioner.
Course OutlineDownload
Number of Credits3
Offering DepartmentGlobal Studies Programme
Course TeacherDr. Toru HORIUCHI
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassSep 6, 2021
Last Day of ClassNov 29, 2021
Course ComponentLecture
Mode of TeachingSynchronous
Meeting TimeMon 1430-1715
Time ZoneUTC+8
Course Description This course aims to provide an introduction to global politics, focusing in particular on its origins and historical evolution, its key concepts, major theoretical frameworks, main actors and institutions, the global architecture of power, and its dynamic nature in the process of globalization. It aims to provide students with basic knowledge and analytical tools for making sense of current issues in global politics. It adopts a multi-disciplinary approach that integrates theoretical issues with concrete case studies.

The course first offers a general survey of the key concepts and major theoretical perspectives in the study of Global Politics (Liberalism, Realism, Constructivism, Marxism, etc.). It then proceeds to cover selected topics of global politics in the areas of War and Peace and the Clash of Civilizations. It focuses on how world politics is transformed by globalization, with a focus on its impacts on issues concerning the balance of power, peace and conflicts, and security. Finally, the course will discuss various global issues affecting Global Governance with a particular focus on international law, global poverty and development, environmental issues, infectious diseases, and human rights. Relevant real-world examples and case studies will be used to illustrate big ideas and key concepts of global politics.

This course intends to promote students’ appreciation of the role of ‘power,’ ‘security,’ and ‘justice’ in shaping the global political order today. Students will gain deeper insights into not only the latest developments in global political affairs, but also concepts and theories useful for further studies in politics, international law, and global political economy.
Course OutlineTBA
Number of Credits3
Offering DepartmentGlobal Studies Programme
Course TeacherDr. CHAN Wai Shun
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassSep 8, 2021
Last Day of ClassDec 1, 2021
Course ComponentLecture
Mode of TeachingSynchronous
Meeting TimeWed 1430-1715
Time ZoneUTC+8
Course Description This course aims to provide students the foundational knowledge on the operation of world economy and examine how social, political and institutional factors contribute to the creation of global economic order. It examines the intertwining and interaction of economics (wealth creation) and politics (political power) in global affairs.

As an introductory course to Global Political Economy (GPE), the course will first offer a general survey of the key concepts and major theoretical perspectives in the study of GPE. In the second part, the course will cover various policy issues and discuss how the world economy is transformed by globalization, with a particular focus on the development of various international and regional institutions that govern the current economic order. The course will be concluded with the discussion of the latest trends of global economic governance, with a particular focus on the transforming role of national states and the endeavours of international development on poverty and inequality reduction.

This course is double-coded with UGEC2353. Students are therefore not required to have any background in the discipline.
Course OutlineTBA


The number of credits is shown as provided by the course offering university. The credit structure at the course offering university may be different from the one at your home university. Please contact the VSE Coordinator of your home university for credit transfer information.

Course enrollment is subject to final approval from your home university and the course offering university.