uPage_monash

University of Sydney
Sydney, Australia

The University of Sydney is Australia’s oldest university. Founded in 1850 on the principle of providing people from all backgrounds with the opportunity to realise their potential to make a positive impact in the world through education. The University of Sydney is one of the first universities in the world to admit students on academic merit and today, the University is regularly ranked in the world’s top 50 universities, reflecting a reputation for leadership in research and education.

The University conducts cutting-edge research across the broadest range of disciplines of any Australian university – more than 400 areas of study and is home to a cluster of research centres of the highest calibre that support multidisciplinary, collaborative projects. The University of Sydney also partner with industry, government, non-profit and community organisations to answer the biggest questions facing society, business and our communities, both Australia and abroad.

It is a truly global institution with 70,000 students from more than 140 countries, 350,000 alumni in more than 170 countries and over 250 exchange partners in more than 40 countries. The University has been proud to welcome students and scholars from the Asia-Pacific region and has a strong commitment to providing a full and enriching student experience for each one.

Website: www.sydney.edu.au

VSE Season 1, 2021-22: Courses offered by The University of Sydney


Application Deadline

APPLICATION CLOSED

Students must submit an application to the VSE Central Office before:
Jun 11 2021, 12:00 noon Hong Kong Time (UTC+8)




English Language Proficiency Requirements

Before applying, please make sure you have fulfilled the course offering university's English language proficiency requirements listed below:

English language proficiency must meet the minimum requirements noted in the Study Abroad and Exchange tab of the University of Sydney English language requirements webpage: https://sydney.edu.au/study/how-to-apply/english-language-requirements.html

The University's standard English language proficiency requirement is set at an IELTS overall score of 6.5 with no band below 6.0. For other English tests accepted by the University, refer to the concordance table (pdf, 139KB) to convert the IELTS requirements to others. The only other tests we accept are TOEFL iBT, PTE, Cambridge C1 Advanced or Cambridge C2 Proficiency scores.

For more details, please contact the VSE coordinator at The University of Sydney.




Other Requirements

Please note the University of Sydney requires the submission of a government-issued evidence of identity (i.e. passport) in English.


Course Information

Click on the course titles to reveal full course details:

Number of Credits6
Offering DepartmentSociology and Social Policy
Course TeacherTBA
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassAug 09, 2021
Last Day of ClassNov 12, 2021
Course ComponentLectureTutorial
Mode of TeachingAsynchronousSynchronous
Meeting TimeTBATBA
Time ZoneUTC+10 (before Oct 3, 2021) / UTC+11 (after Oct 3, 2021)
RestrictionsN/A
Course DescriptionThis unit considers key ideas and concepts in criminology, including definitions of crime, criminological theories of crime causation, and the consequences of crime. The unit also examines research methods used in criminology and crime research, including the ethics of conducting criminological research.
Points to Note for StudentsN/A
Course OutlineLink
Number of Credits6
Offering DepartmentMathematics and Statistics Academic Operations
Course TeacherTBA
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassAug 09, 2021
Last Day of ClassNov 12, 2021
Course ComponentTBA
Mode of TeachingTBA
Meeting TimeTBA
Time ZoneUTC+10 (before Oct 3, 2021) / UTC+11 (after Oct 3, 2021)
RestrictionsN/A
Course Description DATA1001 is a foundational unit in the Data Science major. The unit focuses on developing critical and statistical thinking skills for all students. Does mobile phone usage increase the incidence of brain tumours? What is the public's attitude to shark baiting following a fatal attack? Statistics is the science of decision making, essential in every industry and undergirds all research which relies on data. Students will use problems and data from the physical, health, life and social sciences to develop adaptive problem solving skills in a team setting. Taught interactively with embedded technology, DATA1001 develops critical thinking and skills to problem-solve with data. It is the prerequisite for DATA2002.
Points to Note for StudentsN/A
Course OutlineLink
Number of Credits6
Offering DepartmentLife and Environmental Sciences Academic Operations
Course TeacherTBA
Language of InstructionEnglish
First Day of ClassAug 09, 2021
Last Day of ClassNov 12, 2021
Course ComponentTBA
Mode of TeachingTBA
Meeting TimeTBA
Time ZoneUTC+10 (before Oct 3, 2021) / UTC+11 (after Oct 3, 2021)
RestrictionsN/A
Course Description In the 21st century the population of the world will increase both in size and its expectation in terms of food, energy and consumer demands. Against this demand we have a planet in crisis where natural resources are degraded, biodiversity is diminishing and planetary cycles related to climate are reaching points of irreversible change. Management of our precious natural resources is a balancing act between production and conservation as always, but now we have to do this against a background of potential large scale changes in climate. In this unit students will gain an understanding of the key environmental challenges of the 21st century; namely food security, climate change, water security, biodiversity protection, ecosystems services and soil security. In the second half, using Australian case studies, we will explore how we manage different agro-ecosystems within their physical constraints around water, climate and soil, while considering linkages with the global environmental challenges. Management now, in the past and the future will be considered, with an emphasis on food production. This unit is recommended unit for students interested in gaining a broad overview of the environmental challenges of the 21st century, both globally and within Australia.
Points to Note for StudentsN/A
Course OutlineLink
Number of Credits6
Offering DepartmentGovernment and International Relations
Course TeacherTBA
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassAug 09, 2021
Last Day of ClassNov 12, 2021
Course ComponentLectureTutorial
Mode of TeachingAsynchronousSynchronous
Meeting TimeTBATBA
Time ZoneUTC+10 (before Oct 3, 2021) / UTC+11 (after Oct 3, 2021)
RestrictionsN/A
Course DescriptionThis unit provides students with a foundational understanding in two key areas of international relations. First students will gain an understanding of the history of the international political and economic system, and the forces, events, and processes that have shaped the contemporary international system. Second, students will be introduced to the main theories of international relations and explore how these help explain the forces that shape international relations.
Points to Note for StudentsN/A
Course OutlineLink
Number of Credits6
Offering DepartmentInternational Business
Course TeacherTBA
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassAug 09, 2021
Last Day of ClassNov 12, 2021
Course ComponentTBA
Mode of TeachingTBA
Meeting TimeTBA
Time ZoneUTC+10 (before Oct 3, 2021) / UTC+11 (after Oct 3, 2021)
RestrictionsN/A
Course Description Critical to effective management in international and multicultural business environments is an understanding of cultural differences and how to manage those differences. This unit provides conceptual frameworks and evidence from practice that develops an understanding of the ways in which cultures differ, how these differences can impact management, and how cultural issues can limit organisational effectiveness. Strategies for managing and harnessing cultural differences are also evaluated. The subject matter is explored from an internal perspective as well as from an external perspective, looking at issues within the company as well as issues between the multinational company and its host environment. Major topics include the significance of culture in international management; the meaning and dimensions of culture; comparative international management styles; managing communication across cultures; global business ethics; cross-cultural negotiations; cross-cultural leadership and motivation; culture and consumer behaviour; and managing cross-cultural conflict.
Points to Note for StudentsN/A
Course OutlineLink
Number of Credits6
Offering DepartmentBusiness Information Systems
Course TeacherTBA
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassAug 09, 2021
Last Day of ClassNov 12, 2021
Course ComponentTBA
Mode of TeachingTBA
Meeting TimeTBA
Time ZoneUTC+10 (before Oct 3, 2021) / UTC+11 (after Oct 3, 2021)
RestrictionsN/A
Course Description The Digital Economy, with its focus on information as a key business resource, has changed the way Business Information Systems (BIS) is viewed in organisations. BIS are now seen as enablers of innovation in which people, supported by powerful technology, are considered to be the most important component. This is because problem-solving, innovation and critical thinking skills cannot be outsourced or easily acquired by competitors. This unit is designed to develop your understanding of how businesses operate. It shows how information systems support business operations and management through integration of people, business processes and systems. You will be provided with an introduction to state-of-the-art business analysis techniques, frameworks and models to assist in understanding the nature and contribution of BIS in a range of business contexts. With its emphasis on business rather than IT, this unit does not require prior IT-related experience. In this unit, you will learn about the increasingly important role of IT in business and acquire valuable business analysis and problem-solving skills.
Points to Note for StudentsN/A
Course OutlineLink
Number of Credits6
Offering DepartmentMarketing
Course TeacherTBA
Language of InstructionEnglish
First Day of ClassAug 09, 2021
Last Day of ClassNov 12, 2021
Course ComponentTBA
Mode of TeachingTBA
Meeting TimeTBA
Time ZoneUTC+10 (before Oct 3, 2021) / UTC+11 (after Oct 3, 2021)
RestrictionsN/A
Course Description This unit examines the relationships among marketing organisations and final consumers in terms of production-distribution channels or value chains. It focuses on consumer responses to various marketing decisions (product mixes, price levels, distribution channels, promotions, etc.) made by private and public organisations to create, develop, defend, and sometimes eliminate, product markets. Emphasis is placed on identifying new ways of satisfying the needs and wants and creating value for consumers. While this unit is heavily based on theory, practical application of the concepts to "real world" situations is also essential. Specific topics of study include: market segmentation strategies; market planning; product decisions; new product development; branding strategies; channels of distribution; promotion and advertising; pricing strategies; and customer database management.
Points to Note for StudentsN/A
Course OutlineLink
Number of Credits6
Offering DepartmentPhilosophy
Course TeacherTBA
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassAug 09, 2021
Last Day of ClassNov 12, 2021
Course ComponentLectureTutorial
Mode of TeachingAsynchronousSynchronous
Meeting TimeTBATBA
Time ZoneUTC+10 (before Oct 3, 2021) / UTC+11 (after Oct 3, 2021)
RestrictionsN/A
Course DescriptionThis unit is an introduction to central issues in political philosophy, theories of knowledge and philosophical conceptions of the self. The first part will consider the state, freedom and political obligation. The second part will examine some of the major theories of knowledge in the modern philosophical tradition. The final section will look at conceptions of the self as a knowing and acting subject.
Points to Note for StudentsN/A
Course OutlineLink


The number of credits is shown as provided by the course offering university. The credit structure at the course offering university may be different from the one at your home university. Please contact the VSE Coordinator of your home university for credit transfer information.

Course enrollment is subject to final approval from your home university and the course offering university.