Courses

uCoruse13

Korea University
Seoul, South Korea

Founded in 1905, the Korea University (KU) campus covers over 182 acres and is home to more than 35,000 students from all over the nation and the world.

The university’s academic breadth is extensive with its 81 departments in 19 colleges and divisions, and 18 graduate schools and it has over 1,400 full-time faculty members with over 95% of them holding a Ph.D. or equivalent qualification in their field. KU has particularly strong Humanities and Asian Studies Departments along with the recently established Graduate School of International Studies (GSIS). KU is also renowned for its professional schools of Law, Medicine and Business Administration. In research, KU is an internationally recognized leader with over 100 research centers, including the East Asiatic Research Centre and the Korean Cultural Research Centre. Furthermore, Korea University Business School (KUBS) is the only and the first business school in the country to have acquired both European Quality Improvement System (EQUIS) accreditation, in combination with the accreditation granted by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB).

Website: www.korea.edu

Course offerings for commencement in August/September 2020
Application Closed

Number of Credits3
Offering DepartmentDepartment of Business Administration
Course TeacherProf. Tony Garrett
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassSep 1, 2020
Last Day of ClassDec 15, 2020
Course ComponentLecture
Mode of TeachingSynchronous
Meeting TimeTue & Thu
0900-1015
For VSE Students, course recordings and/or other asynchronous learning components are available (TBA)
Time ZoneKorean Time (UTC+9)
Restrictions-
Course Description Managing in the constantly changing environment of the 21st century for business success is a challenging job for marketing managers. The key challenges for managers include: understanding the market as a fundamental premise of formulating market-driven strategy; strategies for undertaking market analysis and identification of current and future competitive positions. This advanced level marketing course is designed to develop new skills and consolidate prior knowledge and skills learned in other marketing courses to develop a proactive strategic marketing management approach.
Course OutlineEnglish
Number of Credits3
Offering DepartmentDivision of International Studies
Course TeacherProf. Jinwon Lee
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassSep 2, 2020
Last Day of ClassDec 14, 2020
Course ComponentLecture
Mode of TeachingSynchronous
Meeting TimeMon & Wed
0900-1015
For VSE Students, course recordings and/or other asynchronous learning components are available (TBA)
Time ZoneKorean Time (UTC+9)
Restrictions-
Course Description Globalization is commonly understood as shrinking of space between countries and the intensification of the exchange of economic, political, cultural, and social relations between people on the globe. What do the Nike, the World Bank, Legos, the financial and debt crisis, income inequality, climate change, renewable energy, development, gender equality, and the war on terror have in common? All are manifestations of the contemporary process (or processes) known as globalization. Globalization is a contested keyword that falls outside established disciplinary frameworks, it is a topic that merits serious attention in the field of international studies.

In this introductory course, students will be introduced to the key concepts and theoretical perspectives on globalization, which will then be used as analytical tools to understand different historical stages and substantive aspects of globalization. It is the aim of this course to discuss the major scholarly concepts and debates around globalization and encourage students to critically think about them and apply those frameworks to analyze specific cases of globalization.
Course OutlineEnglish
Number of Credits3
Offering DepartmentDivision of International Studies
Course TeacherProf. Andrew Eungi Kim
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassSep 1, 2020
Last Day of ClassDec 15, 2020
Course ComponentLecture
Mode of TeachingSynchronous
Meeting TimeTue
1400-1645,
1530-1645
For VSE Students, course recordings and/or other asynchronous learning components are available (TBA)
Time ZoneKorean Time (UTC+9)
Restrictions-
Course Description This course is designed to introduce students to the main aspects of contemporary Korean society, including those pertaining to the family, industrialization, gender, aging, population, religion, and urbanization. The course will specifically focus on topics and issues that figure prominently in the lives of the Korean people, such as the continuing importance of Confucianism in Korean culture, rising divorce rates, gender inequality, education frenzy, the rise of Christianity, increasing ethnic diversity, hallyu (the Korean Wave), and urban problems. Each of these issues will be examined through sociological, historical, and comparative perspectives. The assigned readings include chapters from an introductory sociology textbook to enhance the students’ understanding of the workings of society and to help broaden their perspective to appreciate the social institutions of other countries. Every effort will be made to make each session lively and engaging, so your active participation is extremely important and is a vital part of the course.
Course OutlineEnglish
Number of Credits3
Offering DepartmentDivision of International Studies
Course TeacherProf. Robert Rudolf
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassSep 7, 2020
Last Day of ClassDec 21, 2020
Course ComponentLecture
Mode of TeachingSynchronous
Meeting TimeMon & Wed
1530-1645
For VSE Students, course recordings and/or other asynchronous learning components are available (TBA)
Time ZoneKorean Time (UTC+9)
Restrictions-
Course Description This course provides an introduction to both theory and empirical evidence on economic growth and development. We will discuss basic explanations for why countries differ in their levels of income, human development, and ultimately quality of life. These explanations include the roles of savings, demographics, education, technology, institutions, colonization, governments, culture, geography, inequality and gender. Economic growth will be studied as a core ingredient for countries in attaining higher states of human development and overcoming poverty. We will further discuss the dilemma of the economic growth paradigm in a world with limited resources and the question whether further economic growth is really necessary in high income countries. Students should be familiar with basic economic concepts; thus they are required to have taken an introductory economics course before taking this course.
Course OutlineEnglish
Number of Credits3
Offering DepartmentDepartment of Economics
Course TeacherProf. Dirk Bethmann
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassSep 1, 2020
Last Day of ClassDec 15, 2020
Course ComponentLecture
Mode of TeachingSynchronous
Meeting TimeTue & Thu
1030-1145
For VSE Students, course recordings and/or other asynchronous learning components are available (TBA)
Time ZoneKorean Time (UTC+9)
Restrictions-
Course Description Economic theory consists of microeconomics and macroeconomics. Principles of Economics 2 introduces to you the field of macroeconomics which considers economies as a whole. Typical questions in macroeconomics include how can short-run fluctuations be minimized or how can long-run economic growth be sustained. During the course of the semester we will cover topics such as the measurement of national income, economic growth, unemployment, inflation, money, international trade and exchange rates, short-run fluctuations, the effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policy, and the Phillips curve.

At the end of this course, we should have a general understanding of macroeconomic phenomena and theory. We should be able to have a general understanding of the unique perspective taken by macroeconomists in their study of society and human behavior. Also, we should be able to understand the methods used by macroeconomists and how they are applied to everyday decisions.
Course OutlineEnglish
Number of Credits3
Offering DepartmentDepartment of Korean History
Course TeacherProf. Leighanne Kimberly Yuh
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassSep 2, 2020
Last Day of ClassDec 16, 2020
Course ComponentLecture
Mode of TeachingSynchronous
Meeting TimeMon & Wed
1400-1515
For VSE Students, course recordings and/or other asynchronous learning components are available (TBA)
Time ZoneKorean Time (UTC+9)
Restrictions-
Course Description A general survey of the historical development of various aspects of Korean civilization, including politics, society and economy, thought and religion, and the arts. Half of the course will cover the main themes in Korean history and their historical interpretations, from prehistoric times to the modern period. It will also pay special attention to social systems, religion and culture, as well as the changing geopolitics of the region. The other half of the course will take a comparative approach by examining contemporaneous China, Japan, and northeast Asia, identifying similarities and differences between the regions. Through this course, students will have a better understanding of the challenges Korea faced in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and the historical processes through which Korea, China, and Japan developed.
Course OutlineEnglish
Number of Credits3
Offering DepartmentSchool of Media & Communication
Course TeacherProf. Myeongseon Lee
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassSep 2, 2020
Last Day of ClassDec 16, 2020
Course ComponentLecture
Mode of TeachingSynchronous
Meeting TimeMon & Wed
0900-1015
For VSE Students, course recordings and/or other asynchronous learning components are available (TBA)
Time ZoneKorean Time (UTC+9)
Restrictions-
Course Description This is an introductory course in media studies, designed to help students broaden their understanding of the media landscape. This will be achieved through a multifaceted examination of the fundamental aspects of media study.
Course OutlineEnglish
Number of Credits3
Offering DepartmentSchool of Media & Communication
Course TeacherProf. Hee Sun Park
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassSep 2, 2020
Last Day of ClassDec 16, 2020
Course ComponentLecture
Mode of TeachingSynchronous
Meeting TimeMon & Wed
0900-1015
For VSE Students, course recordings and/or other asynchronous learning components are available (TBA)
Time ZoneKorean Time (UTC+9)
Restrictions-
Course Description This course examines theory and research on the role of communication in the development, maintenance, and termination of interpersonal relationships. The course consists of an overview of the major (meta-) theoretical approaches to understanding interpersonal communication. Then, the course will take on a topical organization, roughly tracking the progression of relationships from initiation through termination. Several topics relevant to communication and relationships (e.g., love and conflict) will be explored in depth. The class will be conducted from a lecture/discussion format. Since virtually everyone in the class has both personal and vicarious experience with relationships, the students are encouraged (but not required) to actively participate.
Course OutlineEnglish
Number of Credits3
Offering DepartmentSchool of Media & Communication
Course TeacherProf. Hyerin Shin
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassSep 1, 2020
Last Day of ClassDec 15, 2020
Course ComponentLecture
Mode of TeachingSynchronous
Meeting TimeTue 1200-1345
Thu 1300-1350
For VSE Students, course recordings and/or other asynchronous learning components are available (TBA)
Time ZoneKorean Time (UTC+9)
Restrictions-
Course Description As technological breakthroughs expand our bodily and mental presence, the question of being presses us with an ever-greater urgency. How do we define and know who we are when augmentations, extensions, or even replacements of the body are realistic ventures, and the properties of the human mind subject to reproduction, preservation, and emulation in the form of digital code? If the human form and its internal mechanism could be compatible with that of machines, and algorithms could interact with or even replace us in their cognitive capacity, what IS being human? This course explores how the cinematic medium represents, reflects on, and inspires our understanding of presence. Key topics include AI; robots and cyborgs; XR; videogames; and other apparatuses/phenomena that instantiate digitally networked electronic presence. Students will watch/read and discuss select films and critical texts; offer group presentations; and engage in written critique both in and outside of class.
Course OutlineEnglish
Number of Credits3
Offering DepartmentDepartment of Korean Language and Literature
Course TeacherProf. Jeffrey Holliday
Language of Instruction English
First Day of ClassSep 1, 2020
Last Day of ClassDec 15, 2020
Course ComponentLecture
Mode of TeachingSynchronous
Meeting TimeTue & Thu
0900-1015
For VSE Students, course recordings and/or other asynchronous learning components are available (TBA)
Time ZoneKorean Time (UTC+9)
RestrictionsKnowledge of Korean (2 years of college-level Korean recommended)
Course Description The purpose of this course is to provide a broad introduction to the linguistic analysis of Korean. We will cover a range of topics, focusing on phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics, and also cover a bit of orthography, history, and dialects.

This course will be conducted in English. The idea of teaching this course in English may seem interesting, special, or even funny to some people, but it is important to separate the object of study (the Korean language) from the language through which knowledge about it is conveyed (which could be Korean, English, or any other language). It should be uncontroversial to say that any subject can be studied in any language: It is strange to think that certain subjects could only be properly studied in certain languages, and I don’t believe there is any reason to think otherwise just because the object of study is a language itself. To claim otherwise is to claim that some languages are inherently incapable of conveying certain ideas.

It is true, however, that the scholarly field of “Korean linguistics” – i.e. the (scientific) study of the Korean language – is approached differently in Korea and elsewhere (in fact even that very definition of the field might differ). Although this course is taught in English, it is not merely a translation of the Korean version of the course: Please be aware that we will mainly approach the subject from a non-Korean perspective. We will see exactly what that means as we proceed throughout the semester.

Our discussions will also include some discussion of other languages, in attempt to show how Korean is (and is not) different from them.

If you are a native speaker of Korean: Please be aware that there will probably be a fair number of non-native speakers in the classroom, and so some discussion will be geared toward helping them understand things about Korean that you may find obvious. If you do not wish to participate in such discussion, then this course might not be for you.

If you are NOT a native speaker of Korean: It is nearly impossible to tackle the course content without already knowing the basics of the language. While I have no way of checking your previous coursework, please be aware that the homework assignments and exams will assume knowledge of Korean, and if you choose to enroll in this course without sufficient preparation your grade will likely suffer. My recommended preparation is the equivalent of 2 years of college-level Korean (≈ 300 contact/classroom hours). If you have only had 1 year of college-level Korean (≈ 150 hours) you may be fine, but please be prepared to put in some extra effort. If you have had less than 1 year of college-level Korean I strongly discourage you from enrolling in this course, with the only exception being students have already had some coursework in general linguistics (e.g. an introduction to linguistics, plus one or two additional courses in core topics such as phonetics, phonology, syntax, or semantics).
Course OutlineEnglish



Course enrollment is subject to final approval from your home university and the course offering university. Please contact the APRU VSE Coordinator of your home university for credit transfer information.